Disabled people are still being treated as second class on public transport

Disabled people are still being treated as second class on public transport

‘You’re never free of worry’: buses and trains can be a lifeline for disabled people, but cuts and poor planning are preventing independent travel

“It only needs one bad driver to spoil your day,” says Gwyneth Pedler, a scooter user, in London. “You set off in a morning and you’re worrying. You get to one place and you’re worrying. You’re never free of worry.”

At 91 years old, Pedler, who has rheumatoid arthritis, has been using a scooter on buses and trains for more than a decade, first in Oxford and now in London, after moving nearer to her family two years ago. For Pedler, public transport is a way to keep social in retirement: day trips to Kew Gardens and Southend or a night at a restaurant or the theatre. “I’ve no intention of being a little old lady who sits inside,” she says.

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Source: Guardian Transport

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