Failing Chris Grayling and the tale of the troublesome trains

Failing Chris Grayling and the tale of the troublesome trains

By cancelling rail services in advance rather than arbitrarily on the day, customer satisfaction would be 100%, thought Chris

If you were writing a new series of The Thick of It, you’d hesitate to create a character like Chris Grayling for fear no one would believe in him. Even in the current cabinet, a confederacy of dunces where the sole qualifications for membership are being a bit dim and entirely incompetent, the transport secretary is a class apart.

To say that Failing Grayling has more than his fair share of bad days is a category error. Because that implies he has the occasional good one. He doesn’t. Every day is a desperate, losing struggle against the chaos caused by his own hopelessness. But even for a man who has turned his failure into a monumental work of performance art, Monday hit a new low. Or, as Grayling might see it, a total triumph. The moment he formally achieved the coveted status of the idiot’s idiot.

The new May timetable would be phased in without telling anyone. That way no one could complain if they were late

Related: The Guardian view on Chris Grayling: part of the problem, not the solution | Editorial

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Source: Guardian Transport

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