Going driverless: can self-driving cars gain public trust or will they be derailed?

Going driverless: can self-driving cars gain public trust or will they be derailed?

Driverless vehicles could cut road deaths, reduce congestion and even help elderly people. But without investment and trust they face a bumpy ride

Pools of driverless cars, designated aerial drone highways and intelligently interconnected transport. All the things that could make transport safer and more accessible for everyone are just around the corner.

One of the developments with the biggest potential benefits and social impact is driverless vehicles. Consultants KPMG have predicted that the annual economic and social benefits for the UK from autonomous vehicles could be worth £51bn by 2030, with the greatest share going to the places where autonomous technologies are manufactured and actively introduced.

Related: Electric vehicles could go first at traffic lights under UK clean air zone plans

Related: Your next car will be hacked. Will autonomous vehicles be worth it?

Related: Older drivers: are better tests needed to judge ability behind the wheel?

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Source: Guardian Transport

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