In Britain, it’s not just the train toilets that disabled people can’t get into | Chloe Timms

In Britain, it’s not just the train toilets that disabled people can’t get into | Chloe Timms
Anne Wafula Strike’s experience of having to wet herself won’t be a shock to any disabled person. The reality is that accessibility is inconsistent and unreliable

When it comes to a day out, I don’t do spontaneous. I’m an organisational bore. Booking a cab, looking up train times, finding a restaurant.

This obsessive planning isn’t out of choice but circumstance. I was born with spinal muscular atrophy, a genetic muscle-wasting condition, and I’ve used an electric wheelchair since I was a toddler. Like many other disabled people, I find the stresses of planning a day out are exacerbated when everyday activities, such as catching a train or finding a public toilet, are an obstacle.

Related: Paralympian forced to wet herself on train without accessible toilet

Related: ‘I worry I’ll be forgotten on the train’: our readers’ experiences of accessible facilities

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Source: Guardian Transport

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