In Britain’s chaotic rail system, as elsewhere, we need a clever state to play a full part

In Britain’s chaotic rail system, as elsewhere, we need a clever state to play a full part
The challenge is not to surrender to markets nor to socialise them, but to harness them

Who believes in the magic of self-organising, dynamic markets that never make mistakes? The crisis in British conservatism is that it is simultaneously a believer and non-believer. Just as it wants to be both out of Europe but in it, on its own terms, because that means prosperity and influence, so it proclaims undying fealty to markets while being forced to curb and intervene in them in practice. It turns the party into a political pantomime horse unfit to govern – and may ultimately force its break-up as the strains of the lived inconsistencies become intolerable.

For the dramas of Salzburg betray much deeper and profound intellectual conflicts. Theresa May’s ferociously anti-Europe wing of MPs is animated by a passionate belief in the precepts of US free-market libertarianism and sees Europe as the major intellectual and political obstacle. Last week, a group of British and US rightwing thinktanks published a blueprint for a post-Brexit US-UK trade deal.

Continue reading…

Source: Guardian Transport

<a href="In Britain’s chaotic rail system, as elsewhere, we need a clever state to play a full part” target=”_blank”>In Britain’s chaotic rail system, as elsewhere, we need a clever state to play a full part