London night tube: it’s not just clubbers who can expect to gain

London night tube: it’s not just clubbers who can expect to gain
Switch to 24-hour underground at weekends will also benefit shift workers across capital’s £17bn night economy

With the launch of the night tube, London joins a growing group of cities across the globe that have all-night metro services, including New York, Berlin, Sydney and Barcelona. The promotional tube carriages decked out in glittering stars conjure up images of late-night revellers going home after a night out, but night-time users of public transport are a far more diverse group. Transport for London (TfL) estimates that more than half of night bus passengers are commuting to and from work.

Economists think the night tube could deliver a significant boost to London’s economy. Initially all-night trains will run only on Friday and Saturday nights on the Victoria and Central lines. The economic consultancy Volterra forecasts that the night tube will generate more than enough in extra fares to cover the costs of running it, create almost 2,000 extra permanent jobs and deliver £3.90 of wider economic benefit for every pound invested. Perhaps the pertinent question is why it has taken so long to get tube trains running overnight.

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Source: Guardian Transport

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