Vandalism or art? Graffiti artists' deaths reignite debate

Vandalism or art? Graffiti artists' deaths reignite debate

The three young men killed in London were part of a flourishing subculture vying for a ‘king spot’

On the side of a railway bridge over Barrington Road in Brixton, south London, are the last three tags painted by Harrison Scott-Hood, 23, Alberto Fresneda Carrasco, 19, and Jack Gilbert, 23 – “Lover”, “Trip” and “‘Kbag”. They are likely to stay there for some time, as a poignant memorial to the three young men whose bodies were found 350 yards down the track on Monday morning. All three had been hit by a train.

All week, graffiti artists – or “writers”, in the language of the subculture – from around the world having been paying tribute to the three men. An Instagram page has been collating pictures of their graffiti, as well as artistic tributes. At Loughborough Junction station – the stop closest to where the three died – graffiti writers were among the mourners who have contributed to a shrine, with spray cans nestled among bouquets, and messages sprayed on the wall.

The highest accolade for a graffiti writer is going ‘all-city’, which is having tags on every line, in every postcode

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Source: Guardian Transport

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